With Bob Iger stepping down as CEO of The Walt Disney Company, Center director Jeffrey Cole examines Iger’s extraordinary legacy and the lessons other CEOs can learn from it.

By Jeffrey Cole

Last week, after 15 extraordinary years, Bob Iger handed over the reins as CEO of The Walt Disney Company to the relatively unknown (outside Disney) Bob Chapek. The timing of the announcement—and the fact that it occurred in the middle of a Tuesday afternoon and took place immediately—caught everyone by surprise and raised a few questions. It also marked the beginning of the end of one of the most important and consequential eras of leadership in the history of the entertainment industry—or any industry.

Our work in looking at how companies and industries grapple with disruption shows few if any examples of successful companies disrupting themselves. Most CEOs, when faced with an existential threat (taxis vs. Uber, music vs. Napster) or a new way to doing business (Kodak, Blockbuster), almost always double down on the old ways and try to fight the tidal wave of disruption.

What distinguishes Iger as a great leader and promises a long legacy was his understanding—when he took over a very profitable Disney in 2005—that the company had to disrupt itself. (more)

February 19 — Many Americans are willing to make significant personal tradeoffs to lower their health insurance rates or medical costs, such as agreeing to 24/7 personal monitoring or working with artificial intelligence instead of a human doctor, according to a new study on the future of health care by the Center released today.  

The center’s  results on health insurance coverage mark the first findings in a series of six reports this year that will examine the future of medical care in the United States.  The second round will be released this spring.

For details about the study findings, see the release here.  For perspectives about disruption in health care, see the column by Jeffrey Cole below.

From the Center’s Future of  Health Care Study.

Infographic by Kelsey Dempsey.

See all of the Center’s infographics here

In little more than a decade, social networking sites such as Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube have become an focal point for personal communication. Why do people visit them?

We asked this question of those who visit social networking sites in our Digital Future Survey.  (more)

Pioneering DVR service TiVo announced a comeback plan at this month’s CES, but can even the company that defined TV on the viewer’s terms realize the true potential of streaming video?

By Brad Berens

At January’s Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, TiVo announced the release of a new gadget, the TiVo Stream 4K. On the surface, the TiVo Stream 4K looks like other “dongles” — Amazon’s Fire Stick, Google’s Chrome Stick, and the Roku Streaming Stick are all examples — that plug into a TV’s HDMI slot and let you stream until your eyes dry out because you forget to blink.

However, the TiVo Stream is different because it wants to integrate all the different streaming services into its own, “one user interface to rule them all” experience.  (more)

As the Center announces a major new research initiative about healthcare, director Jeffrey Cole shares the first lessons from the Future of Health project.

By Jeffrey Cole

We Americans spend more money to keep ourselves healthy than on any other aspect of our lives. In 2018, we spent $3.6 trillion on health care or $11,172 per person, an amazing 17.7% of GDP. Nothing else, defense or otherwise, comes close.

When bank-robber Willie Sutton was arrested and asked why he robbed banks, he allegedly was surprised at the question. He replied, “Because that’s where the money is.” Health care in the U.S. is where is the money really is.

With so much money spent to cover less than 90% of the population at high costs, health care is ripe for disruption.

The Center’s work shows that industries with inflated costs, poor service, and inefficient ways of delivering their products or services are ready to be disrupted. Think of the music or taxi industries. Health care has all those qualities, and there’s a massive amount of money to be made disrupting the current system.

That’s why the Center, in a new “Future of Health” project, has taken a major look at the health and medical establishment in order to determine Americans’ satisfaction with health care services and outcomes -as well as the role technology will play in changing our relationships with doctors and hospitals.

Over the next few months, the Center will issue six or seven short releases on various aspects of health and medical care, as well as alternative treatments. The first release (here) examines medical coverage and user satisfaction.

In future weeks, we will look at current and future medical technologies, how we get medical information (particularly online) and what we do with it, relationships with doctors and hospitals, alternative treatments (including marijuana), and attitudes toward medical privacy.  (more)

How quickly should one reply to a personal message received online? What is the appropriate length of time? And has the perceived appropriate length changed over the years?

We have asked this question in our Digital Future Survey since 2012… (more)

From the Center’s Future of Money and Banking Study.

Infographic by Ryan Robbins.

See all of the Center’s infographics here

How many hours per week do you use the Internet at work, not in the home?

The internet is an important tool in many places of work. How many hours per week do workers use the internet at their place of employment, and how has this been changing over time?

Looking at all employed internet users in the Center’s Digital Future Study, the amount of time spent online has been increasing…(more)

From the Center’s Future of Money and Banking Study.

Infographic by Jessica Barroway.

See all of the Center’s infographics here

Is Mayor Pete Buttigieg really surging? Is Senator Elizabeth Warren really the new frontrunner? Can any of the Democratic candidates match Trump’s social media presence? Chief Strategy Officer Brad Berens examines the political Twitterverse.

Most Americans, regardless of party, will agree that Donald Trump has been an unusual President of the United States, including his use of Twitter.

Between his personal Twitter account (@realDonaldTrump) with 66.3 million followers and the official presidential account (@POTUS) with 27 million followers, Trump has a potential 100 million people with whom he can directly connect at any time without the help of his press secretary and even without the press itself.

Never before has a president spoken so directly to the public, or so often. At the moment I’m writing this column, Trump has tweeted or retweeted 18 times today from his personal account.

Advertising people talk about P.O.E.M., which stands for Paid, Owned, and Earned Media. When the Trump re-election campaign buys an ad on Twitter, that is paid media. When somebody retweets the president, that is earned media. Trump’s tweets are owned media: he controls the content utterly. Each tweet has the potential to be seen by 100 million people, which, again in ad-speak, means that it can earn 100 million potential “impressions.”  (more)

The Center has published the tenth edition of World Internet Project report, the collaboration between the Center for the Digital Future and partner organizations in countries worldwide.

The 47-page study explores views and behavior about internet use and non-use, devices for internet access, years online, user proficiency, reasons for not going online, politics and the internet, freedom of expression online, media reliability, online security and personal privacy, and activities on the internet.

Download the tenth World Internet Project Report here.

The Center’s new 147-page “Surveying the Digital Future” report includes more than 100 issues that explore the impact of digital technology on American users and non-users.

New subjects in the study include views about using body-implanted chips for increased security, fake news, mainstream media, and regulation of social media.

Download the report here.

Nearly 60 percent of American banking customers would consider moving their money to accounts offered by familiar companies, such as online retailers, search engines, or big-box stores, even though they have no experience with financial services, according to a new study on the future of money and banking by the Center.

“We strongly believe banking is the next industry to be completely disrupted by digital change,” said Jeffrey Cole, director of the center. “Our research shows customers are far ahead of the banks in looking to the web and apps as their preferred banking methods. Download the Future of Money and Banking Report here.

The Center has published the ninth edition of World Internet Project report, the collaboration between the Center for the Digital Future and partner organizations in countries worldwide.

The 54-page study explores views and behavior about internet use and non-use, devices for internet access, years online, user proficiency, reasons for not going online, politics and the internet, freedom of expression online, media reliability, online security and personal privacy, and activities on the internet.

Download the World Internet Project Report here.

Center director Jeffrey Cole explores transformation of the media for the keynote address at the leadership meeting of the Interactive Advertising Bureau.

View the video here.